TREASON, SEDITION and IMPEACHMENT
Definitions: American Heritage Talking Dictionary v4.0

   trea·son ( ) n. 1. Violation of allegiance toward one's country or sovereign,
especially the betrayal of one's country by waging war against it or by consciously and purposely acting to aid its enemies. 2. A betrayal of trust or confidence. [Middle English from Anglo-Norman treson from Latin tr³diti½ tr³diti½n-a handing over; See tradition ]

 d ½-. Important derivatives are: date add betray edition rent 1 surrender tradition traitor vend donation pardon endow dose antidote To give. I. Contracted from *do -. 1. a. Zero-grade form *d -. DADO , DATE 1 , DATIVE , DATUM , DIE 2 ; ADD , ( BETRAY ), EDITION , PERDITION , RENDER , ( RENT 1 ), ( SURRENDER ), TRADITION , ( TRAITOR ), ( TREASON ), VEND , from Latin  dare , to give; b. (see 4 ) Greek  dosis , something given. 2. Suffixed form *d ½-no-. DONATION , ( DONATIVE ), ( DONOR ); CONDONE , PARDON , from Latin  d ½num, gift. 3. Suffixed form *d ½-t(i)-. a. DOT 2 , DOWAGER , DOWER , ( DOWRY ); ENDOW , from Latin  d ½s (genitive d ½tis), dowry; b. DACHA , from Russian  dacha , gift, dacha, from Slavic  *datja ; c. SAMIZDAT , from Russian  samizdat , samizdat, from dat' , to give. 4. Suffixed form *d ½-ro-. LOBSTER THERMIDOR , from Greek  d ½ron, gift. 5. Reduplicated form *di-d ½-. DOSE ; ANECDOTE , ANTIDOTE , APODOSIS , EPIDOTE , from Greek  didonai , to give, with zero-grade noun dosis  ( < *d -ti-), something given. [ Pokorny d ½- 223. ]

1. (n.) A secret agreement or plan to attain a wrongful end:

    · conspiracy

    · cabal

    · intrigue

    · machination

    · plot

    · scheme

    · collusion

    · connivance

    · treachery

    · sedition

2. (n.) Violation of allegiance to one's country:

    · betrayal

    · disloyalty

    · sedition

    · traitorousness

    · treachery

    · loyality (antonym)

    · patriotism (antonym)

3. (n.) An act or instance of betrayal:

    · perfidy

    · Judas kiss

    · breach of faith

    · disloyalty

    · double-cross

    · duplicity

    · faithlessness

    · falseness

    · infidelity

    · stab in the back

    · traitorousness

    · treachery

    · unfaithfulness

    · foul play

    · fidelity (antonym)

    · faithfulness (antonym)

4. (n.) Willful betrayal of fidelity or confidence:

    · treachery

    · disloyalty

    · faithlessness

    · perfidiousness

    · perfidy

    · traitorousness

    · treacherousness

    · untrustworthiness

    · falseness

    · deceit

    · deceitfulness

    · deception

    · infidelity

    · fidelity (antonym)

    · trustworthiness (antonym)

· faithfulness (antonym)

se·di·tion ( ) n. 1. Conduct or language inciting rebellion against the authority of a state. 2. Insurrection; rebellion. [Middle English sedicioun violent party strife from Old French sedition from Latin sditi½ sditi½n- sd-, s- apart; See s(w)e-  in Indo-European Roots. iti½ act of going( from itus, past participle ofºreto go) ;See ei-  in Indo-European Roots.] se·di tion·ist n.

 ei- . Important derivatives are: ambition circuit exit 2 issue perish sudden transit ion commence initial janitor January To go. I. 1. Full-grade form *ei- . a. ADIT , AMBIENT , ( AMBITION ), CIRCUIT , COITUS , COMITIA , EXIT , INTROIT , ISSUE , OBITUARY , PERISH , PRAETOR , PRETERIT , SEDITION , ( SUBITO ), SUDDEN , ( TRANCE ), TRANSIENT , ( TRANSIT ), ( TRANSITIVE ), from Latin  º re, to go; b. ION ; ANION , CATION , DYSPROSIUM , from Greek  ienai , to go. 2. Suffixed zero-grade form *i-t- . a. further suffixed form *i-t-yo- . COMMENCE , INITIAL , INITIATE , from Latin  initium , entrance, beginning ( in- , in; see en ); b. COUNT 2 , COUNTY ; CONCOMITANT , CONSTABLE , ( VISCOUNT ), from Latin  comes  (stem comit- ), companion ( < “ one who goes with another ”; com- , with; see kom ). 3. Suffixed form *i-ter . ERRANT , EYRE , ITINERANT , ITINERARY , from Latin  iter , journey. 4. Extended form *y ³- ( < *ya -) in suffixed forms *y ³-no-, *y ³-nu-. a. JANITOR , JANUARY , JANUS , from Latin  i ³nus, archway, and I ³nus, god of doors and of the beginning of a year; b. HINAYANA , MAHAYANA , from Sanskrit  y ³nam, way (in Buddhism, “ mode of knowledge, ” “ vehicle”).[ Pokorny 1. ei-  293. ]

 s(w)e- . Important derivatives are: self gossip bustle 1 suicide secede seclude secret secure sedition seduce segregate select separate sure sober sole 2 solitary solitude solo sullen desolate soliloquy custom ethic ethnic idiom idiot idiosyncrasy. Pronoun of the third person and reflexive (referring back to the subject of the sentence); further appearing in various forms referring to the social group as an entity, “ (we our-)selves. ” I. 1. Suffixed extended form *sel-bho- . SELF , from Old English  self , sylf , self, same, from Germanic  *selbaz , self. 2. Suffixed form *s(w)e-bh(o)- . SIB ; GOSSIP , from Old English  sibb , relative, from Germanic  *sibja- , “ one's own, ” blood relation, relative. 3. Suffixed form *se-ge . BUSTLE 1 , from Old Norse  -sk , reflexive suffix, as in b ¿ask, to make oneself ready, from sik , oneself (reflexive pronoun), from Germanic  *sik , self. 4. Suffixed form *swoi-no- . SWAIN ; ( BOATSWAIN ), from Old Norse  sveinn , herdsman, boy, from Germanic  *swainaz , “ one's own (man), ” attendant, servant. 5. Suffixed form *s(u)w-o- , one's own. a. SUICIDE , from Latin  su º (genitive), of oneself; b. SWAMI , from Sanskrit  sv ³min, “ one's own master, ” owner, prince, from sva-  ( < *swo- ), one's own. 6. Extended form *sed . SECEDE , SECERN , SECLUDE , SECRET , SECURE , SEDITION , SEDUCE , SEDULOUS , SEGREGATE , SELECT , SEPARATE , ( SURE ), from Latin  s d, s , s - , without, apart ( < “ on one's own ”); a. SOBER , from Latin  compound s ½brius, not drunk ( brius, drunk; see g w h-). 7. Possibly suffixed lengthened o-grade form *s ½-lo. SOLE 2 , SOLITARY , SOLITUDE , SOLO , SULLEN ; DESOLATE , SOLILOQUY , SOLIPSISM , from Latin  s ½lus, by oneself alone. 8. Extended root *sw ~dh-, “ that which is one's own, ” peculiarity, custom. a. SODALITY , from Latin  sod ³lis, companion ( < “ one's own, ” “ relative”); b. suffixed form *sw dh-sko-. ( CONSUETUDE ), CUSTOM , DESUETUDE , MANSUETUDE , MASTIFF , from Latin  su scere, to accustom, get accustomed; c. ETHIC , ETHOS ; CACOETHES , from Greek  thos, custom, disposition, trait; d. suffixed form *swedh-no- . ETHNIC , ETHNO- , from Greek  ethnos , band of people living together, nation, people ( < “ people of one's own kind ”). 9. Suffixed extended form *swet-aro- . HETAERA , from Greek  hetairos , comrade, companion, earlier hetaros . 10. Suffixed extended form *swed-yo- . IDIO- , IDIOM , IDIOT ; ( IDIOPATHY ), ( IDIOSYNCRASY ), from Greek  idios , personal, private ( “particular to oneself ”). 11. Suffixed form *swei-no- . SINN FEIN , from Old Irish  f in, self. 12. Suffixed (ablatival) form *swe-tos , from oneself. KHEDIVE , from Old Iranian  khvad ³ta-, lord, by haplology from compound form *khvat ½-d³ta-, created from oneself ( d ³ta-, created; see dh -). [ Pokorny se-  882. ]

1. (n.) A secret agreement or plan to attain a wrongful end:

    · conspiracy

    · cabal

    · intrigue

    · machination

    · plot

    · scheme

    · collusion

    · connivance

    · treason

    · treachery

2. (n.) Violation of allegiance to one's country:

    · treason

    · betrayal

    · disloyalty

    · traitorousness

    · treachery

    · loyalityoyality (antonym)

    · patriotism (antonym)

    · insurrection

    · takeover

    · coup

    · coup d'état

    · dethroning

    · insurgency

    · mutiny

    · overthrow

    · putsch

    · rebellion

    · revolt

    · revolution

    · rising

    · subversion

    · uprising

    · compliance (antonym)

    · obedience (antonym)

· acquiescence (antonym)

im·peach ( ) v. tr. im·peached im·peach·ing im·peach·es 1. a. To make an accusation against. b. To charge (a public official) with improper conduct in office before a proper tribunal. 2. To challenge the validity of; try to discredit: impeach a witness's credibility. [Middle English empechen to impede, accuse from Anglo-Norman empecher from Late Latin impedic³re to entangle Latin in- in; See in- 2 Latin pedica fetter; See ped-  in Indo-European Roots.] im·peach “er n. im·peach “ment n.

Notes: Nothing hobbles a President so much as impeachment, and there is an etymological as well as procedural reason for this. The word impeach  can be traced back through Anglo-Norman empecher  to Late Latin impedic ³re, “ to catch, entangle, ” from Latin pedica,  “ fetter for the ankle, snare. ” Thus we find that Middle English empechen,  the ancestor of our word, means such things as “ to cause to get stuck fast, ” “ hinder or impede, ” “ interfere with, ” and “ criticize unfavorably. ” A legal sense of empechen  is first recorded in 1384. This sense, which had previously developed in Old French, was “ to accuse, bring charges against. ” A further development of the sense had specific reference to Parliament and its formal accusation of treason or other high crimes, a process that the United States borrowed from the British. Although we have used it rarely at the federal level, impeachment stands as the ultimate snare for those who would take advantage of the public trust.

 ped- . Important derivatives are: foot fetter fetlock pawn 2 pedal pedestrian peon pioneer millipede trivet expedite impede impeach pew podium octopus platypus podiatry pajamas fetch 1 impair pessimism impeccable Foot. I. Nominal root. 1. Lengthened o-grade form *p ½d-. FOOT , from Old English  f ½t, foot, from Germanic  *f ½t-. 2. Suffixed form *ped-ero- . FETTER , from Old English  fetor , feter , leg iron, fetter, from Germanic  *feter ½. 3. Suffixed form *ped-el- . FETLOCK , from Middle English  fitlock , fetlock , fetlock, from a Germanic  source akin to Old High German  vizzelach , fetlock, from Germanic  *fetel- . 4. Basic form *ped- . PAWN 2 , -PED , PEDAL , PEDATE , PEDESTRIAN , PEDI- , PEDICEL , PEDUNCLE , ( PEON ), PES , PIONEER ; MILLIPEDE , SESQUIPEDAL , ( TRIPEDAL ), TRIVET , VAMP 1 , from Latin  p ¶s (stem ped- ), foot. 5. Form *ped-yo- . a. EXPEDITE , from Latin  exped ºre, to free from a snare ( ex- , out of; see eghs ); b. IMPEDE , from Latin  imped ºre, “ to put in fetters, hobble, shackle, ” entangle, hinder ( in- , in; see en ). 6. Suffixed form *ped-ik ³. IMPEACH , from Latin  pedica , fetter, snare. 7. O-grade form *pod- . a. ( PEW ), -POD , PODITE , PODIUM ; ANTIPODES , APODAL , APPOGGIATURA , APUS , LYCOPODIUM , MONOPODIUM , OCTOPUS , ( PELECYPOD ), PHALAROPE , PLATYPUS , PODAGRA , PODIATRY , PODOPHYLLIN , POLYP , ( POLYPOD ), SYMPODIUM , from Greek  pous  (stem pod- ), foot; b. PODZOL , from Russian  pod , under. 8. Suffixed form *ped-ya . TRAPEZIUM , from Greek  peza , foot. 9. Suffixed form *ped-o- . a. PEDO- 1 ; PARALLELEPIPED , from Greek  pedon , ground, soil; b. ( PAISA ), ( PICE ), PIE 3 , PUG 3 , from Sanskrit  padam , footstep, foot, and p ³t, foot; c. PAJAMA , TEAPOY , from Middle Persian  p ³º, leg, foot; d. lengthened-grade form *p ¶d-o-. (i) PILOT , from Greek  p ¶don, rudder, steering oar; (ii) DIAPEDESIS , from Greek  p ¶dan, to leap. 10. Suffixed form ped- º-. CYPRIPEDIUM , from Greek  pedilon , sandal. II. Verbal root *ped- , to walk, stumble, fall. 1. FETCH 1 , from Old English  fetian , feccean , to bring back, from Germanic  *fet ¶n. 2. a. Suffixed (comparative) form *ped-yos- . PEJORATION ; IMPAIR , from Latin  p ¶ior, worse ( < “ stumbling”); b. suffixed (superlative) form *ped-samo- . PESSIMISM , from Latin  pessimus , worst; c. suffixed form *ped-ko- . PECCABLE , PECCADILLO , PECCANT ; IMPECCABLE , from Latin  pecc ³re, to stumble, sin. a, b,  and c  all from Latin  *ped- .[ Pokorny 2. p ~d- 790. ]

1. (v.) To charge with a crime or other wrongful act:

    · incriminate

    · inculpate

    · point the finger at

    · accuse

    · indict

2. (v.) To remove from a position of employment:

    · dismiss

    · fire

    · lay off

    · let go

    · terminate

    · remove

    · release

    · remove

    · oust

    · discharge

    · force out

    · cashier

    · bounce

    · ax (informal)

    · can (slang)

    · sack

    · boot out (informal)

    · pension

    · retire

    · disbar

    · put out to pasture

    · give the ax to

    · give one one's walking papers

    · ax (informal)

    · hire (antonym)

    · employ (antonym)

    · take on (antonym)

 

 

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